Of all things I will soon grow tired



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Reblogged from comedycentral

comedycentral:

Click here to watch Jon Stewart discuss the child immigration debate. And stick around for his extended interview with Hillary Clinton.

(via oldfilmsflicker)

Reblogged from airows

(Source: airows, via intherealmof)

Reblogged from supersmashthestatebros

staff:

supersmashthestatebros:

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hmmmm yeah, tumblr would celebrate Aviation Day, marking barely over a century of human flight when birds had been flying for millions of years before the Wright brothers. never forget.

Tumblr hereby recognizes the accomplishments of birds. 

birdie-told-me, did you see this?

Reblogged from illbeoutback

illbeoutback:

If you’re protesting abortion, the Supreme Court says you can get right in women’s faces and scream at them on their way into the clinic. Because freedom of speech.

But if you try and protest the murder of a black man, you get tear gas fired at you.

(via birdie-told-me)

Reblogged from peaturquill
Reblogged from oldfilmsflicker
oldfilmsflicker:


Mrs. Barham: After every war, you know we always find out how unnecessary it was and after this one, I’m sure all the generals will write books about the blunders made by other generals and statesmen will publish their secret diaries and it’ll show beyond any shadow of doubt that war could easily have been avoided in the first place. And, the rest of us, of course, will be left with the job of bandaging the wounded and burying the dead.Lt. Cmdr. Charles Edward Madison: I don’t trust people who make bitter reflections about war, Mrs. Barham. It’s always the generals with the bloodiest records who are the first to shout what a hell it is. It’s always the war widows who lead the Memorial Day parades.Emily Barham: That was unkind, Charlie, and very rude.Lt. Cmdr. Charles Edward Madison: We shall never end wars, Mrs. Barham, by blaming it on ministers and generals or warmongering imperialists or all the other banal bogeys. It’s the rest of us who build statues to those generals and name boulevards after those ministers. The rest of us who make heroes of our dead and shrines of our battlefields. We wear our widow’s weeds like nuns, Mrs. Barham and perpetuate war by exalting its sacrifices. My brother died at Anzio.Emily Barham: I didn’t know that, Charlie.Lt. Cmdr. Charles Edward Madison: Yes. An everyday soldier’s death, no special heroism involved. They buried what pieces they found of him. But my mother insists he died a brave death and pretends to be very proud.Mrs. Barham: You’re very hard on your mother. It seems a harmless enough pretense to me.Lt. Cmdr. Charles Edward Madison: No, Mrs. Barham. No. You see, now my other brother can’t wait to reach enlistment age. That’ll be in September.Mrs. Barham: Oh, Lord.Lt. Cmdr. Charles Edward Madison: Maybe ministers and generals blunder us into war, Mrs. Barham the least the rest of us can do is to resist honoring the institution. What has my mother got for pretending bravery was admirable? She’s under constant sedation and terrified she may wake up one morning and find her last son has run off to be brave. I don’t think I was rude or unkind before. Do you, Mrs. Barham?Mrs. Barham: No.

Movie Quote of the Day – The Americanization of Emily, 1964 (dir. Arthur Hiller) | the diary of a film history fanatic

oldfilmsflicker:

Mrs. Barham: After every war, you know we always find out how unnecessary it was and after this one, I’m sure all the generals will write books about the blunders made by other generals and statesmen will publish their secret diaries and it’ll show beyond any shadow of doubt that war could easily have been avoided in the first place. And, the rest of us, of course, will be left with the job of bandaging the wounded and burying the dead.
Lt. Cmdr. Charles Edward Madison: I don’t trust people who make bitter reflections about war, Mrs. Barham. It’s always the generals with the bloodiest records who are the first to shout what a hell it is. It’s always the war widows who lead the Memorial Day parades.
Emily Barham: That was unkind, Charlie, and very rude.
Lt. Cmdr. Charles Edward Madison: We shall never end wars, Mrs. Barham, by blaming it on ministers and generals or warmongering imperialists or all the other banal bogeys. It’s the rest of us who build statues to those generals and name boulevards after those ministers. The rest of us who make heroes of our dead and shrines of our battlefields. We wear our widow’s weeds like nuns, Mrs. Barham and perpetuate war by exalting its sacrifices. My brother died at Anzio.
Emily Barham: I didn’t know that, Charlie.
Lt. Cmdr. Charles Edward Madison: Yes. An everyday soldier’s death, no special heroism involved. They buried what pieces they found of him. But my mother insists he died a brave death and pretends to be very proud.
Mrs. Barham: You’re very hard on your mother. It seems a harmless enough pretense to me.
Lt. Cmdr. Charles Edward Madison: No, Mrs. Barham. No. You see, now my other brother can’t wait to reach enlistment age. That’ll be in September.
Mrs. Barham: Oh, Lord.
Lt. Cmdr. Charles Edward Madison: Maybe ministers and generals blunder us into war, Mrs. Barham the least the rest of us can do is to resist honoring the institution. What has my mother got for pretending bravery was admirable? She’s under constant sedation and terrified she may wake up one morning and find her last son has run off to be brave. I don’t think I was rude or unkind before. Do you, Mrs. Barham?
Mrs. Barham: No.

Movie Quote of the Day – The Americanization of Emily, 1964 (dir. Arthur Hiller) | the diary of a film history fanatic

Reblogged from senorpacman

beccaeve:

literaryfirearms:

mooglewerks:

senorpacman:

POKEMON CRIES.

IM GONNA SHIT MYSELJF

I knew this was going to be gold before I even hit play. And I was not disappointed. 

Just press play. This is excellent.

It’s worth it for the one with the mustache

(via banarbra)

Reblogged from vangoghmygod

sp0iledbabe:

blowmarisol:

highfromsanfrancisco:

Always reblog

10/10 THIS

I actually adore her because I’ve NEVER seen a black person get to be so fucking frank and honest about racial injustice on tv.

She’s real, she’s smart, she’s witty, she’s informed and she’s fucking unapologetic. I’m obsessed.

(Source: vangoghmygod, via dogbomberblog)

Reblogged from postracialcomments

rufiozuko:

thelonelythrone:

postracialcomments:

CNN’s Jake Tapper Telling the Truth about Ferguson

Jake Tapper exposing the truth! He earned his stripes today.

this is crazy!!!

(via abbyvicious)

Reblogged from tastefullyoffensive

orlandobloomfistmeintheass:

tastefullyoffensive:

I love the look on his face when he gets to the smallest one.

[theflyhater]

i fucking watched this

for 15 minutes

waiting for the look on his face when he gets to the smallest one

15 minutes

of staring 

i trusted you

do you understand 

how much i want to kill you right now

(via shaunsofthedead)

Reblogged from batmansymbol
ironcheflancaster:

batmansymbol:

by the way did I ever tell y’all about the time I got a blank message from nobody, sent on new year’s eve in 1969, when the internet didn’t exist?
because that happened

OKAY KIDS, LET’S LEARN ABOUT THE UNIX EPOCH
So back in the early days of computers, when we were trying to build clocks to keep all our computers in sync, we tried a bunch of different ways to synchronize them in ways that both normal people could use and programmers could utilize.
We just tried saying “The current time is THIS date” and just storing that date as some text, but while that was easy for humans, it was a bunch of different numbers that worked together in funny ways and computers don’t play nice with a bunch of random, arbitrary rules.
Not much worked, until we realized that we needed a BASELINE to compare against, and a way to represent the current time that covers everybody. So we came up with Unix time, because Unix was the style at the time. Essentially, Unix time represents any given time by saying “How many seconds ago was 12:00 AM on January 1, 1970 in Iceland somewhere?”. Recent enough to keep the numbers relatively small, far enough that nothing computer-y would fall before it, and consistent enough that there’d be no discrepancy based on where you are.
So what happens when you see the date “December 31, 1969” on a buggy message like this is that the computer received a bunch of zeroes by mistake and went “Oh, this must be a message!” Then when it tried to interpret it, it got to the date, found a zero, and said “Zero seconds since the Unix Epoch? I’ll round down - this was sent at the last second of New Year’s Eve, 1969! They’ll be so happy to finally get their blank message.”
And then the computer traipsed off on its merry way, because computers are fucking ridiculous.

ironcheflancaster:

batmansymbol:

by the way did I ever tell y’all about the time I got a blank message from nobody, sent on new year’s eve in 1969, when the internet didn’t exist?

because that happened

OKAY KIDS, LET’S LEARN ABOUT THE UNIX EPOCH

So back in the early days of computers, when we were trying to build clocks to keep all our computers in sync, we tried a bunch of different ways to synchronize them in ways that both normal people could use and programmers could utilize.

We just tried saying “The current time is THIS date” and just storing that date as some text, but while that was easy for humans, it was a bunch of different numbers that worked together in funny ways and computers don’t play nice with a bunch of random, arbitrary rules.

Not much worked, until we realized that we needed a BASELINE to compare against, and a way to represent the current time that covers everybody. So we came up with Unix time, because Unix was the style at the time. Essentially, Unix time represents any given time by saying “How many seconds ago was 12:00 AM on January 1, 1970 in Iceland somewhere?”. Recent enough to keep the numbers relatively small, far enough that nothing computer-y would fall before it, and consistent enough that there’d be no discrepancy based on where you are.

So what happens when you see the date “December 31, 1969” on a buggy message like this is that the computer received a bunch of zeroes by mistake and went “Oh, this must be a message!” Then when it tried to interpret it, it got to the date, found a zero, and said “Zero seconds since the Unix Epoch? I’ll round down - this was sent at the last second of New Year’s Eve, 1969! They’ll be so happy to finally get their blank message.”

And then the computer traipsed off on its merry way, because computers are fucking ridiculous.

(via afortnightinspace)

Reblogged from livvydunham

livvydunham:

fucking hell, tumblr. again!? + i got to the first one before they fixed the typo.

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Reblogged from cellardoornevermore

I remember I was playing a level before, and I got stuck, and people were like ‘so much for awesome level design right?’ The sad fucking irony is that these people don’t even realise that it’s a really fucking sad thing that you can’t even fathom geting lost in a modern videogame.

I’m gonna rant a little bit here.

There was a time, let’s say back in 1996 when we were playing videogames like Duke Nukem 3D, or fucking Tomb Raider, or Mario 64 or some shit… when figuring out where to go and how to get there and being lost was like- that was the content, figuring it out was the content of the videogame because that was satisfying.
Now everything is big fucking pointing arrow, or big long corridor hallway because videogames are just a delivery device for 1) your little cinematic story, and 2) the credits, because all they want you to do is get to the end of the game so you can buy the fucking dlc and then buy the fucking sequel.
Modern videogame designers don’t want you to not finish the game, they just want to create a funnel so you have to finish the fucking game. You know? They couldn’t possibly think that maybe figuring out a level, figuring out how to get around it, where to go, could be the reason we play videogames.
Like that doesn’t even enter the fucking mind of a modern videogame design committee. ‘Oh my God if a player gets lost, or can’t figure it out, or gets stuck, or has to work to get through a fucking level then we’re fucking up and that’s not a good thing.’ That’s what modern game designers think, and that’s a bad thing- it’s horrifying, its horrible. And it’s fucking scary.

You’re right we still have good videogames, but there aren’t good videogames anymore that are good for the reasons that these fucking videogames were good- and that’s fucking sad.
The closest that we have to something like this is something like Dark Souls, where hey, the journey is what makes that game awesome.

Brad Simons. Quality level design.

Brad discussing (ranting) about some hard-truths in the modern videogame industry.

(via cellardoornevermore)

(via cellardoornevermore)

Reblogged from tastefullyoffensive

orlandobloomfistmeintheass:

tastefullyoffensive:

I love the look on his face when he gets to the smallest one.

[theflyhater]

i fucking watched this

for 15 minutes

waiting for the look on his face when he gets to the smallest one

15 minutes

of staring 

i trusted you

do you understand 

how much i want to kill you right now

(via shaunsofthedead)

Reblogged from megazal